Welcome to EXPO
Welcome to ShangHai
2017-12-14

Shanghai Restaurants

shanghai restaurants, eating in shanghai
Eating in Shanghai Over the years Shanghai has become a city that excels at bringing together many different kinds of cuisine. This modern and fashionable city has excellent Continental cuisine in stylish restaurants such as “M” on the Bund and a couple of wonderful Indian restaurants in the Tan door and Hazara. Italian, Thai, Mexican, Vietnamese and even Brazilian and Cajun cuisine are also on offer here and the style and decor in many of the city’s best places such as Face and Ali YYs, is beautiful and unique.

Beyond the various cuisine of the world, Shanghai is a center for the culinary culture of China. Here, you can taste famous dishes and culinary styles from al over the country. Bifengtang is a great chain restaurant serving delicious Cantonese cuisine. Beijing, Yangzhou, Suzhou, Wuxi, Hangzhou, Ningbo, Fujian, Chaozhou, Henan, Anhui, Hunan as well as vegetarian and Xingjiang cuisine are all available with exceptionally high quality and authenticity in this city. Shanghai cuisine too can be very delicious and “1221” is a beautiful place to sample the city’s unique dishes.

Some of the best and most interesting culinary offerings one can find the Shanghai include: Nanxiang Steamed Pork Dumplings, Local River Crabs, Vegetarian Steamed Buns, Chicken and Duck Blood Soup, and Niangao with Spare Ribs.

Shanghai’s world-spanning culinary styles, superior dining environments, cosmopolitan atmosphere and high quality of service make the city a heaven for all those who crave variety and excitement on their plate.

The traditional Shanghai cuisine is called Benbang cuisine (means local). As Benbang cuisines often use heavy oil and red thick sauce, their color are usually read and shiny. The chefs here are good at picking in wine and cooking methods like baking, stewing, steaming, deep-frying and stir-frying and frying. In the latter part of 19th century, Benbang cuisine formed a complex flavor structure and cooking style and technique norms. The cooking of Shanghai cuisine stresses careful selection of materials and fine knifehip.

The traditional Shanghai cuisine is called Benbang cuisine (means local). As Benbang cuisines often use heavy oil and red thick sauce, their color are usually read and shiny. The chefs here are good at picking in wine and cooking methods like baking, stewing, steaming, deep-frying and stir-frying and frying. In the latter part of 19th century, Benbang cuisine formed a complex flavor structure and cooking style and technique norms. The cooking of Shanghai cuisine stresses careful selection of materials and fine knifehip.

Huaiyang Cuisine, encompassing the coastal areas of eastern China, is said to require the most skill in order to preserve the basic flavor of each ingredient to achieve balance and freshness. River fish, farm animals, birds, and vegetables feature prominently, and braising and stewing are more common than stir-flying. Red sauces (from soy sauce, sugar, and oil) are popular. Shanghai, Hangzhou, Suzhou and Yangzhou-style cooking are all minor variations on the same theme.

Beijing or Northern cuisine is typically characterized by its strong, robust flavors and hearty ingredients. Pork and lamb are commonly used due to the Muslim influence in the northwestern part of the country. Staples are heavy noodles and breads instead of rice. Jiaozi, small chunks of meat and vegetables wrapped in dough and boiled are popular snacks also eaten during the Chinese New Year.

Hunan cuisine has three styles of cooking from areas around the Xiangjiang River, Dongting lake and western Hunan. The Xiangjiang River cuisine is the most popular one with four characteristics: tasty, savory, hot and sour. The Suandoujiao Rouni, or Sour String Bean Cubes with Smashed Meat reflects the four tastes all at the same time. You will find that all the bean cubes are eaten up while the meat is left, because the tender and sour bean cubes, which were preserved in salt, will arouse your appetite.

Sicuan cooking, born in the damp interior of Southwestern China, relies heavily on chilies, peppers, peppercorns, and garlic; spicy and pungent flavors are the result.